Centre of Theology and Philosophy Soul Conference: Reflections

Oxford2013_Poster

Dear Friends and Family,

Well, I’m up, if not at ’em, this morning and back in Nottingham after the Centre of Theology and Philosophy’s conference on The Soul. The conference was, in a word, excellent. Never have I attended a conference so large, so full of varying positions on the conference theme (as well as other issues) and yet so friendly and cordial. I made many new friends and got to spend time with some old ones.

My paper was given on Saturday and I am told it went well. I will be submitting for review and hopefully publication with the other conference papers given. I’ll let you know the results of that as well as who the publisher will be once I know.

Both the plenary sessions and the panel sessions were filled with excellent papers. Some of my favourites, in terms of plenary papers, would have to include both David Bentley Hart’s and John Milbank’s which both sought to show that we cannot think of ourselves or the world without a notion of the soul. For both presenters, the soul is not something one has, as if, in kind of Cartesian sense, one could still be a human without a soul, but that to be human is to be made of body and soul and to reflect on this will turn us to see God.

Before John and David, however, there was Iain and Conor. Iain McGilchrist gave an interesting presentation on the brain and the mind. McGilchrist was not wanting to go the direction of fully reductive materialism (I think), but his presentation put most of its emphasis on how the two halves of the brain were split to see things either in parts or as whole. Cunningham’s presentation, however, wanted to insist on why we need to think in terms of soul. For Cunningham (and I’m inclined to agree) pure materialism leaves you in a nihilistic vacuum where nothing can be good or bad. For Cunningham, the soul, and specifically, the Christian understanding of the world is the only way we can truly call things good and bad and have those words mean something.

Marilynne Robinson’s presentation, in part on the need for further beauty in theological writing, was beautifully presented. Robinson speaks with the voice of the unadulterated, the pre-industrialised Midwest. Though I disagreed with her, or at least did not understand her at points, her talk was beautiful. As was the response given by John de Gruchy, which was one of the most charitable responses ever given.

On the last day we heard from both Mary Midgely and later, William Desmond. Midgley, who will be 94 this September, did an excellent job, retaining the vim and vigor of her mind, if not quite her body. Midgely was one of the first to tackle Richard Dawkins back in, I believe, the 1980’s. Desmond rounded out the conference by speaking on Soul Music versus Self Music. As I understood it, the basic point of his presentation is that soul music goes beyond purely the self, that is the individual and connects all to all in expressing our innermost being.

Desmond finished off his presentation, after Milbank gave an excellent response, the fashion you’ll see below.

I definitely didn’t see this coming and was overjoyed when it did. Desmond also mentioned that enjoyed one of my favourite movies from when I was a child, Darby O’Gill and the Little People.

All in all, this was an excellent conference and certainly plan to continue attending them so long as we have the time and money for me to do so.

Yours,
David

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Preparing for a Conference: Centre for Theology and Philosophy Conference on the Soul

Oxford2013_Poster

Dear Friends and Family,

This week I and several of my colleagues here at the University of Nottingham are preparing ourselves for this year’s Centre of Theology and Philosophy conference on The Soul. The line-up definitely looks excellent:

Plenary 1: Iain McGilchrist and Conor Cunningham

Plenary 2: John Milbank and David Bentley Hart

Plenary 3: Marilynne Robinson with response from John de Gruchy

An Interview with Mary Midgley in conversation with Graham Ward

Plenary 4: William Desmond and respondents.

Plus a great line-up of parallel sessions, one of which I’ll be presenting in on C. S. Lewis, his science-fiction, the Church Fathers, and, of course, deification.

Therefore, my time this week is going to spent working on my second chapter and refining my presentation for the conference. What this means for me is mornings spent writing one thing, and afternoons spent editing another. Here’s hoping I don’t get the two confused.

Also, perhaps quite apropos for the paper I’m giving, this year’s conference is in Oxford, so you can trust that trips to the Eagle and Child Pub, where the Inklings would meet once a week, will be in my future. I’ll write another post once the conference is over. For now, enjoy the rest of your week as I get ready to confer.

Yours,
David

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: The Wrap Up

Humanities Building, University Park Campus

Humanities Building, University Park Campus

Dear Friends and Family,

Well, today I just wanted to do a quick wrap-up of the past few weeks. I had the idea to start highlighting some of the members of our staff that I knew well and who, in my opinion, were not well known outside their specific circles. I wanted to introduce people to some of the truly stellar members of our faculty about whom they might not have heard. This quickly turned into short pieces on all our staff members, thanks to the encouragement of one Peter Watts, a colleague of mine here at the university who has recently submitted his thesis and teaches some of our Biblical Studies classes. I know some of our faculty members better than others, that’s just the nature of doing a specific degree in such a diverse department.

I cannot stress enough how excellent our faculty are here in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies. If you’re thinking of doing undergraduate, Master’s level, or PhD studies in Theology and(/or) Religious Studies, I can whole heartedly recommend our department as an excellent choice.

One final mention I want to make is to those who are even more unsung, our administrative staff and those on short-term contracts. In the latter category I wish to highlight Sam Kimbriel, a recent Cambridge grad who took over for Conor Cunningham this past year while Conor was at Princeton. I’m not sure what Sam’s plans are for next year, but be on the look out for some excellent work to come from him. Also, as I said, I want to celebrate our administrative staff. Our department would not function without them. If you are interested in studying at Nottingham, get in touch with any of them and they’ll connect you to the right person. Contact them here.

I hope you’ve enjoyed the videos and will benefit from the bibliographies I’ve posted. I will try to update these as new videos come out or as faculty members join or leave our department.

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions about studying Theology and Religious Studies at Nottingham at atxdm2_at_nottingham.ac.uk.

Yours,
David

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Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alison Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Tom O’Loughlin

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Richard Bell

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Roland Deines

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alan Ford

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Philip Goodchild

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: John Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Karen Kilby

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Frances Knight

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Carly Crouch

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Conor Cunningham

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Holger Zellentin

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Agata Bielik-Robson

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Jon Hoover

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Jon Hoover

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Dear Friends and Family,

Today I want to introduce you to our Islamic Studies associate professor, Dr Jon Hoover. Jon, as well as his wife, often teach courses on the history of Islam as well as the relation of Islam to other religions, both historically and contemporaneously.

Jon did his BS in Mechanical Engineering from Virginia Tech. From there, his interests seem to have changed and he received an MA in Theological Studies from the Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminary in Indiana. He received his PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Birmingham. Jon then spent several years teaching in Beirut and learning Arabic in Cairo. He joined our faculty in 2010.

Bibliography

  • Editor, Hiwār al-haqīqa min ajl al-hayāt ma‘an / Dialogue of Truth for Life Together, vol. 2 (Beirut: NEST Publications, 2008).
  • Ibn Taymiyya’s Theodicy of Perpetual Optimism (Leiden: Brill, 2007). [Google books]
  • “Ibn Taymiyya,” in Christian-Muslim Relations: A Bibliographical History, Vol. 4 (1200-1350), ed. David Thomas and Alex Mallett (Leiden: Brill 2012), 824-878. [pdf]
  • “Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya,” in Christian-Muslim Relations: A Bibliographical History, Vol. 4 (1200-1350), ed. David Thomas and Alex Mallett (Leiden: Brill 2012), 989-1002. [pdf]
  • “Ibn al-Ḥājj al-ʿAbdarī,” in Christian-Muslim Relations: A Bibliographical History, Vol. 4 (1200-1350), ed. David Thomas and Alex Mallett (Leiden: Brill 2012), 893-896. [pdf]
  • “God’s Wise Purposes in Creating Iblīs: Ibn Qayyim al-Ğawziyyah’s Theodicy of God’s Names and Attributes,” in A Scholar in the Shadow: Essays in the Legal and Theological Thought of Ibn Qayyim al-Ğawziyyah, ed. Caterina Bori and Livnat Holtzman, Oriente Moderno monograph series, 90.1 (2010): 113-134. [pdf]
  • “The Apologetic and Pastoral Intentions of Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya’s Polemic against Jews and Christians,” The Muslim World 100.4 (2010), 471-484. [Open Access]
  • “God Acts by His Will and Power: Ibn Taymiyya’s Theology of a Personal God in his Treatise on the Voluntary Attributes,” in Ibn Taymiyya and His Times, ed. Yossef Rapoport and Shahab Ahmed (Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2010), 55-77. [pdf]
  • “The Lord’s Prayer: A Mennonite View,” in On Spirituality: Essays from the third Shi’i Muslim Mennonite Christian Dialogue, ed. M. Darrol Bryant, Susan Kennel Harrison, and A. James Reimer (Kitchener, ON: Pandora Press, 2010), 99-114. [pdf]
  • A Common Word: ‘More positive and open, yet mainstream and orthodox’,” Theological Review of the Near East School of Theology 30.1 (April 2009), 50-77. [pdf]
  • “Islamic Universalism: Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya’s Salafī Deliberations on the Duration of Hell-Fire,” The Muslim World 99.1 (Jan. 2009), 181-201. [Open Access]
  • “Islamic Monotheism and the Trinity,” The Conrad Grebel Review 27.1 (Winter 2009), 57-82. [Publisher’s corrected version]
  • “Writing the Resistance: Recent Books on Hizbullah from Lebanese Perspectives,” Theological Review of the Near East School of Theology 28.1 (April 2007), 47-69.[pdf]
  • “The Justice of God and the Best of All Possible Worlds: The Theodicy of Ibn Taymiyya,” Theological Review of the Near East School of Theology 27.2 (November 2006), 53-75. [pdf]
  • “Ibn Taymiyya as an Avicennan Theologian: A Muslim Approach to God’s Self-Sufficiency,” Theological Review of the Near East School of Theology 27.1 (April 2006), 34-46.[pdf]
  • “An Anabaptist Perspective on Conversing with Muslims,” in Evangelical, Ecumenical, and Anabaptist Missiologies in Conversation: Essays in Honor of Wilbert R. Shenk, ed. James R. Krabill, Walter Sawatsky and Charles E. Van Engen (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Press, 2006), 120-129, 287-288.
  • “Perpetual Creativity in the Perfection of God: Ibn Taymiyya’s Hadith Commentary on God’s Creation of this World,” Journal of Islamic Studies 15.3 (Sept. 2004): 287-329. [pdf]
  • “Revelation and the Islamic and Christian Doctrines of God,” Islamochristiana 30 (2004): 1-14. French translation, “La révélation et les doctrines musulmane et chrétienne sur Dieu,” Chemins de Dialogue: Penser la foi dans l’esprit d’Assise 28 (2006): 167-190.
  • “A Typology of Responses to the Philosophical Problem of Evil in the Islamic and Christian Traditions,” The Conrad Grebel Review 21.3 (Fall 2003): 81-96.

Videos

Why Study Ibn Taymiyya?

Why Study Islamic Studies?

I hope you’ve enjoyed Jon’s videos. Hopefully some renewed interest will mean Jon will be in some more. However, if you look around youtube, you can also find Jon serving as interviewer for several other University of Nottingham videos on aspects of Islam.

Yours,
David

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Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Tom O’Loughlin

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Richard Bell

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Roland Deines

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alan Ford

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Philip Goodchild

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: John Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Karen Kilby

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Frances Knight

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Carly Crouch

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Conor Cunningham

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Holger Zellentin

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Agata Bielik-Robson

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Agata Bielik-Robson

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Dear Friends and Family,

Today I want to introduce to you the other member of our Jewish studies team, Agata Bielik-Robson. I don’t know Agata’s background very well, nor has she written anything about on her university webpage. I do know that Agata spends half of her year with us in Nottingham and the other half in her native land of Poland teaching at Warsaw University.

Agata teaches primarily Jewish philosophy. Her interests include modern Jewish philosophy from Baruch Spinoza to Jacques Derrida, Jewish Gnosticism (of an anti-spirit not anti-matter nature), and contemporary philosophy, especially as it relates to theology.

Agata teaches a variety of courses on modern Jewish philosophy and is well liked by her students.

Bibliography

  • 2013. Oedipus Meets Job. On Neighbourly Relations between Jews and Greeks in Franz Rosenzweig’s Star of Redemption Rosenzweig Jahrbuch 7: Dialogsphilosophie. 7, 44-68
  • 2013. From Therapy to Redemption: Notes Towards a Messianic Psychoanalysis. In: Traces of Judaism in Contemporary Thought A. Bielik-Robson, A. Lipszyc. Routledge. (In Press.)
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2012. The Promise of the name: Jewish nominalism as the critique of idealist traditionBamidbar: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy. 3(1), 11-35
  • 2012. Erros. Mesjański witalizm i filozofia Universitas, Cracow.
  • 2012. Taking Life out of Nature. Jewish Messianic Vitalism and the Issue of Denaturalization Radical Orthodoxy. Theology, Philosophy, Politics. 1(1-2), 167-187
  • 2012. Homo anxius. Modernity on Its Way from Fear to Joy. In: Civilisation and Fear: Anxiety and the Writing of the Subject W. Kalaga. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2011. The Psychic Palimpsest: Freud, Derrida and Bloom on the Textual Metaphor of the Soul.In: BOZENA SHALCROSS, ed., The Effect of Palimpsest Frankfurt: Peter Lang Verlag.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2011. Messiah without Resentment, or What Remains of Messianism in Giorgio Agamben’s Remnants of Auschwitz Bamidbar. The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy. 1(1/2011),
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2011. Tarrying with the Apocalypse: the wary messianism of Rosenzweig and Levinas. In:BRADLEY, A. and FLETCHER, P., eds., The messianic now: philosophy, religion, culture Routledge.
  • 2011. Another Conversion.: Stanisław Brzozowski’s ‘Diary’ as an Early Instance of the Post-Secular Turn to ReligionStudies in East European Thought. 63(4), 279-291
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2011. Denaturalization and the Issue of Life in Jewish and Greek Thought. In: ORIETTA OMBROSI, ed., Tra Torah e Sophia. Orrizonti e frontiere della filosofia ebraica Milano: Casa Editrice Marietti.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2011. The saving lie: Harold Bloom and deconstruction Northwestern University Press.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2010. The Broken Constellation: Agamben’s Theology between Tragedy and Messianism Telos.152(Fall 2010), 103-126
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2009. Tarrying with the Apocalypse. The Wary Messianism of Rosenzweig and Levinas Journal for Cultural Research. 249-266
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2009. The Apocalyptic Breeze: Nihilism as a Messianic Strategy. In: ANETA SZYLAK AND GALIL ELIAT, ed., Chosen Tel Aviv: Institute of Digital Art.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2009. Troubles with Divine Aesthetics: A. J. Heschel’s Tarrying with the Sublime. In: ADAM LIPSZYC AND STANISŁAW KRAJEWSKI, ed., Abraham Joshua Heschel. Philosophy, Theology and Interreligious Dialogue Wiesbaden: Harrasowitz Verlag. 67-86
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2008. The Traps of the Sublime The Journal of Cultural and Religious Theory, 9.2.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2008. Promises and Excuses. Derrida and the Aporia of Narcissism Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2008. Aporias of Revelation: The Intrigue of Trace between Mysticism and Atheism. In: ADAM LIPSZYC, ed., Emmanuel Levinas. Between Philosophy and Theology Warsaw-Jerusalem: Adam Mickiewicz Institute Press.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2008. Slavoj Zizek, or How to Philosophize with a Hammer (and a Sickle) International Journal of Zizek Studies.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2008. Nihilism through the Looking Glass: Nietzsche, Rosenzweig, and Scholem on the Condition of Modern Disenchantment Revero. Revista de Estudas da Religiao.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2004. Die beeinflusste Seele: Harold Bloom und die Theorie der agonistischen Subjektivierung.In: PAWEL DYBEL AND HANS JÖRG SANDKÜHLER, ed., Der Begriff des Subjekts in der modernen und postmodernen Philosophie Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Verlag.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2003. Hermeneutics as Via Negativa: Paul Ricoeur and the Romantics. In: ANDRZEJ WIERCIŃSKI, ed., Between Suspicion and Sympathy. Paul Ricoeur’s Unstable Equilibrium Toronto: The Hermeneutic Press.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2002. Limits of Irony: Freedom and Responsibility in Culture. In: P. JUCHACZ AND P. KOZLOWSKI, ed., Freiheit und Verantwortung. Moral, Recht, Politik Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Verlag.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2002. The Primacy of Difference; On the Lack of Equillibrium in the Contemporary Moral Discourse. In: M. KEMPNY AND A. JAWLOWSKA, ed., The East-West Convergencies London: Greenwood.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2002. Freedom and Dependence: A Psychoanalytical Contribution to the Problem of Determination Angelaki. Journal of The Theoretical Humanities. 7(3/2002),
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2000. Bad timing: The Subject as a Work of Time Angelaki. Journal of The Theoretical Humanities. 5(3/2000),

Videos

Why Study Jewish Studies?

Why Study Baruch Spinoza?

Why Study Jewish Philosophy?

How do we view life? With Tom O’Loughlin and Agata Bielik-Robson

Pesach

I hope you’ve enjoyed Agata’s videos. Make sure you check out her publications to learn about her thought.

Yours,
David

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Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Richard Bell

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Roland Deines

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alan Ford

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Philip Goodchild

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: John Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Karen Kilby

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Frances Knight

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Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Holger Zellentin

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Holger Zellentin

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Dear Friends and Family,

Today I want to introduce you to another member of our faculty, Dr Holger Zellentin. While I’ve many kitchen conversations with Holger, he’s definitely one whose work I’m not very familiar with. However, his insights during seminars certainly show him to be an excellent thinker.

Holger, who teaches Jewish Studies, began his higher education career at the Université des Sciences Humaines de Strasbourg where he received a degree in Protestant theology. Holger went on to do two MAs at the University of Amsterdam focusing on Hebrew studies and literature. From Amsterdam, Holger went on to another MA at Princeton before doing his PhD in Religions of Late Antiquity and Program in the Ancient World, Department of Religion, again at Princeton. Holger was appointed to our faculty in January of 2011.

Holger’s primary research interests circle around early Christian and early Muslim era Judaism and the relationship between these three religions. Holger has also recently been given the AHRC Research Fellowship Jewish Christianity and the Quran. You can learn more about his work this project, here.

Bibliography

  • Rabbinic parodies of Jewish and Christian literature. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2011.
  • Late antiquity upside-down rabbinic parodies of Jewish and Christian literature. Thesis (Ph. D.)–Princeton University, 2007.
  • Avot De-Rabbi Natan: Synoptische Edition Beider Versionen (review). Hebrew Studies (2011) 49, 363-366.
  • [Review of] Elements of Ancient Jewish Nationalism. AJS Review (2008). 32, 397-400.

Videos

Why Study Rabbinic Judaism?

Why Study Religion?

Why Study The Talmud?

Foundation Narratives with Tom O’Loughlin and Holger Zellentin

Pesach

I hope you’ve enjoyed these videos with Holger. If you, like me, find his work fascinating, check out some of his published works.

Yours,
David

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Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Tom O’Loughlin

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Richard Bell

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Roland Deines

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alan Ford

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Philip Goodchild

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: John Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Karen Kilby

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Frances Knight

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Carly Crouch

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Conor Cunningham

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Conor Cunningham

conorcunninghamDear Friends and Family,

Today I want to introduce you to someone who I have heard others call the rock star of the theology department here at Nottingham, Conor Cunningham. Conor is certainly one of the most well known faces from our department and his name is perhaps second only to that of John Milbank in certain theological and philosophical circles.

Conor was born and raised in Belfast, and remained there until his university days. He began his academic career studying law, but through various channels found his way first to a degree in philosophy and then another in theology, on top of his law degree. Conor did his PhD initially under John Milbank, but when Milbank took up a position in Virginia, Conor finished his degree under the supervision of Graham Ward (another man who works within the sensibility of Radical Orthodoxy).

Conor’s courses centre around philosophy, theology, and science. He co-teaches a course Atheism with many other members of our faculty, as well as a course on Darwinism and theology. Conor’s teaching list also includes courses on phenomenology and philosophy of religion. Conor’s research interests are nearly as broad as his personality and this makes him an excellent writer and an entertaining and informative lecturer.

Bibliography

Below are three main works by Conor to show the breadth of his research interests.

  • “Being Recalled: Life as Anamnesis.” In Divine Transcendence and Immanence in the Work of Thomas Aquinas, edited by Harm Goris, Herwi Rikhof, and Henk Schoot, 59–80. New Series XIII. Leuven: Peeters, 2009.
  • Darwin’s Pious Idea: Why the Ultra-Darwinists and Creationists Both Get It Wrong. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 2010. 236
  • Genealogy of Nihilism: Philosophies of Nothing and the Difference of Theology. Radical Orthodoxy. London: Routledge, 2002.

Videos

Why Study Nature and Grace?

Why Study Atheism?

Why Study Theology?

Why Study Evolution?

Did Darwin Kill God?

I hope you’ve enjoyed Conor’s videos, especially his enthusiasm. I highly recommend his Darwin’s Pious Idea for any who want to see the short-comings of Ultra-Darwinism and Creationism.

Yours,
David

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Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Tom O’Loughlin

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Richard Bell

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Roland Deines

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alan Ford

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Philip Goodchild

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: John Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Karen Kilby

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Frances Knight

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Carly Crouch

What is Radical Orthodoxy?