Faeriean Metaphysics: Seeing the Soul and the Perilous Realm

Mushrooms. A fairy ring in a lawn. Measures 7 ...

Mushrooms. A fairy ring in a lawn. Measures 7 feet in diameter. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Dear Friends and Family,

Several times now on this blog have I written about Faerie and the enchantment of our universe. Today I wanted to reflect on a few different things I’ve come across lately in relation to this.

What Is Faeriean Metaphysics?

Faeriean is an adjective I made up at the recent Centre of Theology and Philosophy Conference on the Soul after hearing John Milbank’s response to William Desmond’s paper. I’ll come back to that in a moment. I got the idea for the phrasing from Jonathan McIntosh, who has an excellent blog called The Flame Imperishable, and a whole category called The Metaphysics of Faerie, where he does some work on theology and philosophy in J. R. R. Tolkien. For me, Faeriean Metaphysics is the act whereby we recognise the enchanted nature and mystery of our universe. It helps us to see the world with fresh eyes, eyes willing to see wonder in everything. Faeriean metaphysics is the act whereby we recognise that ontology, that is being, is not static, reducible, or de-mythologised. I’m still working on this notion, but I think it is important that our metaphysics include, and be shaped by, Faerie.

The Secret Commonwealth

English: The Minister's Pine According to loca...

English: The Minister’s Pine According to local legend, the spirit of the Reverend Robert Kirk who is said to have had contact with the faerie world is trapped within the tree. To this day people still tie pieces of material or “clooties” to the branches of the tree in the hope of having their wishes granted. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Secret Commonwealth, are the peoples who make up what is known as Faerie, Fairyland, Elfland, The Perilous Land, Logres (in Britatin), and many other names. A certain Robertus Kirk wrote a book by this title in the Seventeenth Century. In this book, Kirk argues that there are some who are born with second sight, that is the ability to see those things in nature which are typically invisible, faeries, aspects of the future, etc. Kirk even seeks to connect this to the prophets in Bible. They were imbued with the second sight from birth and this accounts for the ability to hear directly from God and see visions. It also meant, however, that they could see elves and fairies. David Bentley Hart in an article on First Things entitled The Secret Commonwealth, comments that Kirk’s understanding of the world is, at the very least, better than the sterilised vision of the world given to us by Modernity. Hart writes:

Moreover, even if one suspects this is not a matter so much of illusion as of delusion, again that is of no consequence. A delusion this amiable is endlessly preferable to boredom, for boredom is the one force that can utterly defeat the will to be, and so the will to care at all what is or is not true. It is only some degree of prior enchantment that allows the eye to see, and to seek to see yet more. And so, deluded or not, a belief in fairies will always be in some sense far more rational than the absolute conviction that such things are sheer nonsense, and that the cosmos consists in nothing but brute material events in haphazard combinations. Or, I suppose, another way of saying this would be that the ability of any of us to view the world with some sort of contemplative rationality rests upon the capacity we possessed as children to see in everything a kind of articulate mystery, and to believe in far more than what ordinary vision discloses to us: a capacity that endows us with that spiritual eros that allows us to know and love the world, and that we are wise to continue to cultivate in ourselves even after age and disillusion have weakened our sight.

In the end, as Puddleglum would agree, if the make-believe is better than the real world, I’ll take the make-believe every time.

John Milbank, Faerie, and The Soul

Finally, I noted at the beginning that I came up with the word faeriean after John gave a response to William Desmond’s paper at the Soul Conference in Oxford. John said, and I’m paraphrasing here, to believe in fairies is to believe in the soul. For John, Faerie leads us to the soul, the form of our bodies (in an Aristotelian sense), for both can only be seen when we have the eyes to see. I want to turn this ’round, however. To believe in the soul is to believe in Faerie. Kirk thought only some were born with the second-sight. I would agree when it comes to prophets, especially those who see the outcome of current and future events. However, I believe every Christian who is a temple of the Holy Spirit is imbued with the second-sight, with the ability to see Faerie.

We only need to change our perception and we shall see the world rightly. This we must do, or we shall go blind.

So, do you believe in Faerie?

Yours,
David

Related Articles

“God, Gods, and Fairies”

Why Edmund isn’t Judas: The Chronicles of Narnia, Allegory or Supposition?

Lies Breathed through Silver or How God Creates History: Myths and Christianity

The Enchantment of Creation Or, I Do Believe in Faerie

In Defence of Harry Potter, Or Harry Potter and the Magic of Christianity

More Tolkien: Looking forward to the Hobbit

Before The Hobbit

In Defence of Father Christmas

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: The Wrap Up

Humanities Building, University Park Campus

Humanities Building, University Park Campus

Dear Friends and Family,

Well, today I just wanted to do a quick wrap-up of the past few weeks. I had the idea to start highlighting some of the members of our staff that I knew well and who, in my opinion, were not well known outside their specific circles. I wanted to introduce people to some of the truly stellar members of our faculty about whom they might not have heard. This quickly turned into short pieces on all our staff members, thanks to the encouragement of one Peter Watts, a colleague of mine here at the university who has recently submitted his thesis and teaches some of our Biblical Studies classes. I know some of our faculty members better than others, that’s just the nature of doing a specific degree in such a diverse department.

I cannot stress enough how excellent our faculty are here in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies. If you’re thinking of doing undergraduate, Master’s level, or PhD studies in Theology and(/or) Religious Studies, I can whole heartedly recommend our department as an excellent choice.

One final mention I want to make is to those who are even more unsung, our administrative staff and those on short-term contracts. In the latter category I wish to highlight Sam Kimbriel, a recent Cambridge grad who took over for Conor Cunningham this past year while Conor was at Princeton. I’m not sure what Sam’s plans are for next year, but be on the look out for some excellent work to come from him. Also, as I said, I want to celebrate our administrative staff. Our department would not function without them. If you are interested in studying at Nottingham, get in touch with any of them and they’ll connect you to the right person. Contact them here.

I hope you’ve enjoyed the videos and will benefit from the bibliographies I’ve posted. I will try to update these as new videos come out or as faculty members join or leave our department.

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions about studying Theology and Religious Studies at Nottingham at atxdm2_at_nottingham.ac.uk.

Yours,
David

Related Posts

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Simon Oliver

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Mary Cunningham

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alison Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Tom O’Loughlin

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Richard Bell

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Roland Deines

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alan Ford

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Philip Goodchild

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: John Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Karen Kilby

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Frances Knight

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Carly Crouch

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Conor Cunningham

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Holger Zellentin

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Agata Bielik-Robson

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Jon Hoover

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Agata Bielik-Robson

372bd6d0-0cd4-4ba0-b89b-3149746fa83d_260x

Dear Friends and Family,

Today I want to introduce to you the other member of our Jewish studies team, Agata Bielik-Robson. I don’t know Agata’s background very well, nor has she written anything about on her university webpage. I do know that Agata spends half of her year with us in Nottingham and the other half in her native land of Poland teaching at Warsaw University.

Agata teaches primarily Jewish philosophy. Her interests include modern Jewish philosophy from Baruch Spinoza to Jacques Derrida, Jewish Gnosticism (of an anti-spirit not anti-matter nature), and contemporary philosophy, especially as it relates to theology.

Agata teaches a variety of courses on modern Jewish philosophy and is well liked by her students.

Bibliography

  • 2013. Oedipus Meets Job. On Neighbourly Relations between Jews and Greeks in Franz Rosenzweig’s Star of Redemption Rosenzweig Jahrbuch 7: Dialogsphilosophie. 7, 44-68
  • 2013. From Therapy to Redemption: Notes Towards a Messianic Psychoanalysis. In: Traces of Judaism in Contemporary Thought A. Bielik-Robson, A. Lipszyc. Routledge. (In Press.)
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2012. The Promise of the name: Jewish nominalism as the critique of idealist traditionBamidbar: The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy. 3(1), 11-35
  • 2012. Erros. Mesjański witalizm i filozofia Universitas, Cracow.
  • 2012. Taking Life out of Nature. Jewish Messianic Vitalism and the Issue of Denaturalization Radical Orthodoxy. Theology, Philosophy, Politics. 1(1-2), 167-187
  • 2012. Homo anxius. Modernity on Its Way from Fear to Joy. In: Civilisation and Fear: Anxiety and the Writing of the Subject W. Kalaga. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2011. The Psychic Palimpsest: Freud, Derrida and Bloom on the Textual Metaphor of the Soul.In: BOZENA SHALCROSS, ed., The Effect of Palimpsest Frankfurt: Peter Lang Verlag.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2011. Messiah without Resentment, or What Remains of Messianism in Giorgio Agamben’s Remnants of Auschwitz Bamidbar. The Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy. 1(1/2011),
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2011. Tarrying with the Apocalypse: the wary messianism of Rosenzweig and Levinas. In:BRADLEY, A. and FLETCHER, P., eds., The messianic now: philosophy, religion, culture Routledge.
  • 2011. Another Conversion.: Stanisław Brzozowski’s ‘Diary’ as an Early Instance of the Post-Secular Turn to ReligionStudies in East European Thought. 63(4), 279-291
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2011. Denaturalization and the Issue of Life in Jewish and Greek Thought. In: ORIETTA OMBROSI, ed., Tra Torah e Sophia. Orrizonti e frontiere della filosofia ebraica Milano: Casa Editrice Marietti.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2011. The saving lie: Harold Bloom and deconstruction Northwestern University Press.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2010. The Broken Constellation: Agamben’s Theology between Tragedy and Messianism Telos.152(Fall 2010), 103-126
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2009. Tarrying with the Apocalypse. The Wary Messianism of Rosenzweig and Levinas Journal for Cultural Research. 249-266
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2009. The Apocalyptic Breeze: Nihilism as a Messianic Strategy. In: ANETA SZYLAK AND GALIL ELIAT, ed., Chosen Tel Aviv: Institute of Digital Art.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2009. Troubles with Divine Aesthetics: A. J. Heschel’s Tarrying with the Sublime. In: ADAM LIPSZYC AND STANISŁAW KRAJEWSKI, ed., Abraham Joshua Heschel. Philosophy, Theology and Interreligious Dialogue Wiesbaden: Harrasowitz Verlag. 67-86
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2008. The Traps of the Sublime The Journal of Cultural and Religious Theory, 9.2.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2008. Promises and Excuses. Derrida and the Aporia of Narcissism Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2008. Aporias of Revelation: The Intrigue of Trace between Mysticism and Atheism. In: ADAM LIPSZYC, ed., Emmanuel Levinas. Between Philosophy and Theology Warsaw-Jerusalem: Adam Mickiewicz Institute Press.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2008. Slavoj Zizek, or How to Philosophize with a Hammer (and a Sickle) International Journal of Zizek Studies.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2008. Nihilism through the Looking Glass: Nietzsche, Rosenzweig, and Scholem on the Condition of Modern Disenchantment Revero. Revista de Estudas da Religiao.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2004. Die beeinflusste Seele: Harold Bloom und die Theorie der agonistischen Subjektivierung.In: PAWEL DYBEL AND HANS JÖRG SANDKÜHLER, ed., Der Begriff des Subjekts in der modernen und postmodernen Philosophie Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Verlag.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2003. Hermeneutics as Via Negativa: Paul Ricoeur and the Romantics. In: ANDRZEJ WIERCIŃSKI, ed., Between Suspicion and Sympathy. Paul Ricoeur’s Unstable Equilibrium Toronto: The Hermeneutic Press.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2002. Limits of Irony: Freedom and Responsibility in Culture. In: P. JUCHACZ AND P. KOZLOWSKI, ed., Freiheit und Verantwortung. Moral, Recht, Politik Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Verlag.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2002. The Primacy of Difference; On the Lack of Equillibrium in the Contemporary Moral Discourse. In: M. KEMPNY AND A. JAWLOWSKA, ed., The East-West Convergencies London: Greenwood.
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2002. Freedom and Dependence: A Psychoanalytical Contribution to the Problem of Determination Angelaki. Journal of The Theoretical Humanities. 7(3/2002),
  • BIELIK-ROBSON, A., 2000. Bad timing: The Subject as a Work of Time Angelaki. Journal of The Theoretical Humanities. 5(3/2000),

Videos

Why Study Jewish Studies?

Why Study Baruch Spinoza?

Why Study Jewish Philosophy?

How do we view life? With Tom O’Loughlin and Agata Bielik-Robson

Pesach

I hope you’ve enjoyed Agata’s videos. Make sure you check out her publications to learn about her thought.

Yours,
David

Related Posts

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Simon Oliver

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Mary Cunningham

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alison Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Tom O’Loughlin

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Richard Bell

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Roland Deines

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alan Ford

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Philip Goodchild

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: John Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Karen Kilby

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Frances Knight

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Carly Crouch

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Conor Cunningham

Celebrating Theology and Religious Studies Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Holger Zellentin

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Conor Cunningham

conorcunninghamDear Friends and Family,

Today I want to introduce you to someone who I have heard others call the rock star of the theology department here at Nottingham, Conor Cunningham. Conor is certainly one of the most well known faces from our department and his name is perhaps second only to that of John Milbank in certain theological and philosophical circles.

Conor was born and raised in Belfast, and remained there until his university days. He began his academic career studying law, but through various channels found his way first to a degree in philosophy and then another in theology, on top of his law degree. Conor did his PhD initially under John Milbank, but when Milbank took up a position in Virginia, Conor finished his degree under the supervision of Graham Ward (another man who works within the sensibility of Radical Orthodoxy).

Conor’s courses centre around philosophy, theology, and science. He co-teaches a course Atheism with many other members of our faculty, as well as a course on Darwinism and theology. Conor’s teaching list also includes courses on phenomenology and philosophy of religion. Conor’s research interests are nearly as broad as his personality and this makes him an excellent writer and an entertaining and informative lecturer.

Bibliography

Below are three main works by Conor to show the breadth of his research interests.

  • “Being Recalled: Life as Anamnesis.” In Divine Transcendence and Immanence in the Work of Thomas Aquinas, edited by Harm Goris, Herwi Rikhof, and Henk Schoot, 59–80. New Series XIII. Leuven: Peeters, 2009.
  • Darwin’s Pious Idea: Why the Ultra-Darwinists and Creationists Both Get It Wrong. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 2010. 236
  • Genealogy of Nihilism: Philosophies of Nothing and the Difference of Theology. Radical Orthodoxy. London: Routledge, 2002.

Videos

Why Study Nature and Grace?

Why Study Atheism?

Why Study Theology?

Why Study Evolution?

Did Darwin Kill God?

I hope you’ve enjoyed Conor’s videos, especially his enthusiasm. I highly recommend his Darwin’s Pious Idea for any who want to see the short-comings of Ultra-Darwinism and Creationism.

Yours,
David

Related Posts

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Simon Oliver

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Mary Cunningham

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alison Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Tom O’Loughlin

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Richard Bell

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Roland Deines

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alan Ford

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Philip Goodchild

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: John Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Karen Kilby

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Frances Knight

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Carly Crouch

What is Radical Orthodoxy?

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: John Milbank

CLB-milbank

Dear Friends and Family,

John Milbank is perhaps the most well-known member of our faculty here in the department of Theology and Religious Studies. John holds the position of Professor in Religion, Politics and Ethics and is primarily a research professor, teaching only a few classes, primarily graduate level, a year. John has studied at Oxford, Cambridge, under Rowan Williams, and the University of Birmingham where he did his PhD under Leon Pompa on Giambatista Vico.

The two primary courses John teaches are Justice and Theology and Postmodernism (which he has unofficially renamed Theology, Philosophy, and Post-postmodernism. Both classes are a kind of reading interesting books with John Milbank seminar style classes. John also teaches on Proclus, Thomas Aquinas, and Hegel in the Plato to Hegel course.

John is more well known for his theological writings and a theological sensibility called Radical Orthodoxy. See my post ‘What is Radical Orthodoxy?‘ to get an idea of what it’s about and some seminal works on the subject. John is also the husband of Alison Milbank, featured earlier (see below).

Bibliography

This is really only a select bibliography, John has many other works out there. He also writes frequently for ABCReligion.

  • MILBANK, J., 2013. The ethics of honour and the possibility of promise. In: UDOFF, A., ed., Vladimir Jankelevitch and the question of forgiveness
  • MILBANK, J., 2012. Against human rights: liberty in the western tradition The Oxford Journal of Law and Religion.1(1), 203-234
  • MILBANK, J., 2011. On “Thomistic Kabbalah” Modern Theology.
  • MILBANK, J., 2011. Hume versus Kant: Faith, Reason and Feeling Modern Theology.
  • DAVIS, C., MILBANK, J., PICKSTOCK, C. and ZIZEK, S., eds., 2010. Paul’s New Moment: Continental Philosophy and the Future of Christian Theology Brazos.
  • MILBANK, J., 2010. The Mystery of Reason. In: CANDLER, P. and CUNNINGHAM, C., eds., The Grandeur of Reason: Religion, Tradition and Universalism SCM.
  • MILBANK, J., 2010. The New Divide: Romantic versus Classical Orthodoxy Modern Theology.
  • MILBANK, J., 2010. A Closer Walk on the Wild Side. In: WARNER, M., ET AL., ed., Varieties of Secularism in a Secular Age Harvard University Press.
  • MILBANK, J., 2010. Without Heaven there is only Hell on Earth: 15 Verdicts on Zizek’s Response Political Theology.
  • MILBANK, J., 2010. Culture and Justice Theory, Culture and Society.
  • ŽIŽEK, S. and MILBANK, J., 2009. The monstrosity of Christ: paradox or dialectic? MIT Press.
  • MILBANK, J. and OLIVER, S., eds., 2009. The Radical Orthodoxy Reader Routledge.
  • MILBANK, J., 2009. Geopolitical Theology: Economy, Religion and Empire after 9/11. In: MORGAN, M., ed., The Impact of 9/11 on Religion and Philosophy Palgrave-Macmillan.
  • MILBANK, J., 2009. Radical Orthodoxy: A Conversation. In: OLIVER, S., ed., The Radical Orthodoxy ReaderRoutledge.
  • MILBANK, J., 2009. Afterword: The Grandeur of Reason and the Perversity of Rationalism. In: OLIVER, S., ed., The Radical Orthodoxy Reader
  • MILBANK, J., 2009. Sophiology and Theurgy: The New Theological Horizon. In: PABST, A. and SCHNEIDER, C., eds.,Radical Orthodoxy and Eastern Orthodoxy Ashgate.
  • MILBANK, J., 2009. Commentary: Ecumenical Orthodoxy – A Response to Nicholas Loudovikos. In: PABST, A. and SCHNEIDER, C., eds., Radical Orthodoxy and Eastern Orthodoxy Ashgate.
  • MILBANK, J., 2008. The Future of Love Wipf and Stock.
  • MILBANK, J., 2008. Stale Expressions: The Management-Shaped Church Studies in Christian Ethics.
  • MILBANK, J., 2006. The Thomistic Telescope: truth and identity American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly. 80(2),193-226
  • MILBANK, J., 2005. The suspended middle: Henri de Lubac and the debate concerning the supernatural London: SCM Press.
  • DAVIS, C., MILBANK, J. and ŽIŽEK, S., eds., 2005. Theology and the political: the new debate Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
  • MILBANK, A.J., 2005. Fictioning Things: Gift and Narrative Religion and Literature. 37(3), 1-37 (In Press.)
  • MILBANK, J., 2005. Materialism and transcendence. In: DAVIS, C., MILBANK, J. and ŽIŽEK, S., eds., Theology and the political: the new debate North Carolina: Duke University Press. xii, 476
  • MILBANK, J., 2003. Being reconciled: ontology and pardon London: Routledge.
  • MILBANK, J. and PICKSTOCK, C., 2001. Truth in Aquinas London: Routledge.

Videos

Why study Henri de Lubac?

The Big Society with Simon Oliver and John Milbank

Radical Orthodoxy with Simon Oliver and John Milbank

I hope you’ve enjoyed John’s videos, you can find many more on various topics on YouTube. I also hope you’ve found John interesting. If so, and you want to read something by him, I highly recommend Being Reconciled as the best place to start. Theology and Social Theory may be his foundational work, but Being Reconciled is more comprehensible and much shorter.

John is an excellent man and theologian. I highly recommend looking around at his work and getting to know what he’s about for yourself.

Yours,
David

Related Posts

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Simon Oliver

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Mary Cunningham

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alison Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Tom O’Loughlin

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Richard Bell

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Roland Deines

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alan Ford

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Philip Goodchild

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Philip Goodchild

hqdefault-1

Dear Friends and Family,

Today’s faculty member of the Theology and Religious Studies Department at Nottingham is Prof of Religion and Philosophy Philip Goodchild. Now, I have to be fair, I don’t know Philip as well as I do some of the other members of our faculty, but I will be working with him next year when I teach a section of the undergraduate course Great Religious Texts.

Philip did Mathematics as well as Theology and Religious Studies for his undergraduate at Churchill College, Cambridge. He then went on to do his MA and PhD at Lancaster College, after taking a two year break to work. His MA dissertation was on Friedrich Nietzsche and his PhD thesis focused on Gilles Deleuze. Philip sees his three main areas of research as Continental philosophy of religion; the theology of money and globalisation; and truth and religious difference. While I’ve never sat in on one of Philip’s lectures, I can say that he is always capable of asking penetrating questions and giving wonderful insights during departmental seminars

Bibliography

  • GOODCHILD, P., 2013. On philosophy as a spiritual exercise: a symposium Palgrave Macmillan. (In Press.)
  • GOODCHILD P, 2013. The Future of Liberation. In: JOHN D. CAPUTO, CLAYTON CROCKETT and JEFF ROBBINS, eds.,The Future of Continental Philosophy of Religion Fordham University Press. (In Press.)
  • GOODCHILD, P, 2013. Exposing Mammon: Devotion to money in a market society Dialog: A Journal of Theology.52(1), 51-61
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2012. What is wrong with the global financial system? Journal of Interdisciplinary Economics.24(1), 7-28
  • GOODCHILD, P, 2012. Thinking and Life: Philosophy as a Spiritual Exercise. In: STEVEN SHAKESPEARE and KATHARINE MOODY, eds., Intensities: Philosophy, Religion and the Affirmation of Life Ashgate. 165-176
  • GOODCHILD, PHILIP, 2012. Engaged Philosophy of Religion Journal of Cultural and Religious Theory. 12(2), 52-68
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2011. Deleuze and philosophy of religion. In: JOY, M., ed., Continental philosophy and philosophy of religion Springer. 139-164
  • GOODCHILD, P, 2011. The Shadow Side of Debt Common Knowledge. 17(2), 375-382 (In Press.)
  • GOODCHILD, P, 2011. A Theological Interpretation of the Financial Crisis Modern Believing. 52(1), 10-20
  • GOODCHILD, PHILIP, 2011. Is the Secular Age as Secular as it Takes Itself to Be? Kritika & Kontext. XVI(43), 84-91
  • GOODCHILD, P, 2010. Philosophy as a Way of Life: Deleuze on Thinking and Money SubStance. 39(1), 24-37
  • GOODCHILD, P, 2010. The Market, God and Ascetic Life. In: ILKKA PYYSIAINEN, ed., Religion, Economy and Cooperation Walter de Gruyter. 219-236 (In Press.)
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2010. Economies of promise: on Caesar and Christ. In: BRADLEY, A. and FLETCHER, P., eds., The politics to come: power, modernity and the messianic Continuum. 141-160
  • GOODCHILD, P. & N. OTHERS, 2010. Hypocrisy. In: SMITH, A.P. and WHISTLER, D., eds., After the Postsecular and the Postmodern: New Essays in Continental Philosophy of Religion Cambridge Scholars Press. 380-398
  • GOODCHILD, P, 2009. Theology of Money Duke University Press.
  • GOODCHILD, P, 2009. The Political and the Religious Philosophical Meditations. 1(1), 10-18
  • GOODCHILD, P, 2008. The Reasonableness of Philosophy of Religion. In: CHEETHAM, D and KING, R, eds.,Contemporary Practice and Method in the Philosophy of Religion: New Essays London: Continuum. 188-203
  • GOODCHILD, P, 2007. Theology of Money London: SCM-Canterbury Press.
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2006. Truth and Utopia Telos. NUMB 134, 64-82
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2005. Capital and Kingdom: An Eschatological Ontology. In: DAVIS, C., MILBANK, J. and ŽIŽEK, S., eds., Theology and the Political: the New Debate Durham, NC: Duke University Press. 127-152
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2005. Proslogion. In: BENSON, B.E. and WIRZBA, N., eds., The Phenomenology of Prayer New York: Fordham University Press.
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2005. On ‘Religion’: Speeches to its Cultural Despisers. In: CROSSLEY, J.G. and KARNER, C., eds.,Writing History, Constructing Religion Aldershot: Ashgate. 49-63
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2004. Debt, Epistemology and Ecotheology Ecotheology. 9(2), 151-177
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2004. The Return of the Prophet: A Dialogue’ Journal of Cultural and Religious Theory. 5(2), 58-77
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2004. Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari. In: SIMONS, J., ed., Contemporary Critical Theorists: From Lacan to Said Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press. 168-184
  • GOODCHILD, P., ed., 2003. Difference in philosophy of religion Aldershot: Ashgate.
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2003. Oil and Debt: The Collision between Economy and Ecology Situation Analysis. 2, 5-17
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2002. Capitalism and religion: the price of piety London: Routledge.
  • GOODCHILD, P., ed., 2002. Rethinking philosophy of religion: approaches from continental philosophy New York: Fordham University Press.
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2002. Death and Enlightenment in Twelve Brief Episodes Angelaki. VOL 7(PART 2), 39-50
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2000. Spirit of Philosophy: Derrida and Deleuze Angelaki. VOL 5(PART 2), 43-58
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2000. The Logic of Sacrifice in the Book of Job: Philosophy and the Practice of Religion Cultural Values. VOL 4(PART 2), 167-193
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2000. Job as Apologetic: The Role of the Audience Religion. VOL 30(PART 2), 149-168
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2000. Why is Philosophy so Compromised with God?. In: Deleuze and Religion London: Routledge.156-166
  • GOODCHILD, P., 2000. Review of Richard King, ‘Orientalism and Religion’ Religion. 30(3), 300-302
  • GOODCHILD, P., 1999. Money, Gift and Sacrifice: Thirteen Short Episodes in the Pricing of Thought Angelaki. VOL 4(PART 3), 25-40
  • GOODCHILD, P., 1999. Review of Paul Heelas (ed), ‘Religion, Modernity and Postmodernity’ Religion. 21(3), 290-292
  • GOODCHILD, P., 1998. Review of Pamela Sue Anderson, ‘A Feminist Philosophy of Religion’ Religion. 20(4), 435-437
  • GOODCHILD, P.S., 1997. Theory, Culture & Society. 14(2), 1-2/39-50
  • GOODCHILD, P., 1997. Time and Evaluation Antithesis. 8(2), 35-54
  • GOODCHILD, P., 1996. Gilles Deleuze and the question of philosophy Madison: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
  • GOODCHILD, P., 1996. A Theological Passion for Deleuze Theology. VOL 99(ISSUE 791), 357-365
  • GOODCHILD, P., 1996. Deleuze and Guattari: An Introduction to the Politics of Desire London: Sage.
  • GOODCHILD, P., 1995. Christian Ethics in the Postmodern Condition Studies in Christian Ethics. VOL 8(NUMBER 1),20

Videos

Philip has thus far only done a few videos for the department, but he does appear occasionally in the Bibledex videos.

Why Study Money and Theology

Why Study Philosophy as a Spiritual Exercise?

Why Study Religious Diversity with Philip Goodchild

I hope you enjoyed Philip’s videos. Perhaps if more people show interest in them they will do more. Who knows? Take a look at Philip’s work to see more about his interests and approach to theology and philosophy.

Yours,
David

Related Posts

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Simon Oliver

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Mary Cunningham

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alison Milbank

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Tom O’Loughlin

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Richard Bell

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Roland Deines

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Alan Ford

Celebrating Theology Faculty from the University of Nottingham: Simon Oliver

simon_oliverDear Friends and Family,

I’ve been at the University of Nottingham for nearly two years now and have gotten to know many members of our faculty fairly well. That being the case, I thought I would take some time to do posts on some of our faculty. These first posts I intend to do will be on faculty I think to be stellar, but relatively unknown (or at least not widely known).

The first member of our faculty I wish to highlight is Dr Simon Oliver, Head of Department for Theology and Religious Studies here at Nottingham. Simon works in systematic and philosophic theology. Simon is also a priest in the Anglican Church, serving as  honorary Canon Theologian at the minster in Southwell and is an associate priest at a local parish. Simon also happens to be one of my supervisors. He is currently working on a book dealing with creation and teleology that meshes well with my own project on deification. You can read more about Simon’s interests here.

Bibliography

  • OLIVER, SIMON, KILBY, KAREN and O’LOUGHLIN, TOM, eds., 2012. Faithful Reading: New Essays in Theology in Honour of Fergus Kerr London: T&T Clark.
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2012. The Parallel Journey of Faith and Reason: Another Look via Aquinas’s ‘De Veritate’. In:Faithful Reading: New Essays in Theology in Honour of Fergus Kerr London: T&T Clark. 113-130
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2012. Representing Evil in ‘Schindler’s List’ and ‘Life is Beautiful’. In: SELLARS, JEFF, ed., Light Shining in a Dark Place: Discovering Theology through Film Eugene, OR: Pickwick Publications.
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2011. Actuality in Theology and Philosophy. In: MURPHY, FRANCESCA ARAN and BRITTAIN, CHRISTOPHER CRAIG, eds., Theology, University, Humanities: Initium Sapientiae Timor Domini Eugene, OR: Cascade Books. 91-111
  • OLIVER, S., 2010. Trinity, Motion and Creation Ex Nihilo. In: COGLIATI, C., SOSKICE, J. and STOEGER, W., eds.,Creation and the God of Abraham Cambridge University Press. 133-151
  • OLIVER, SIMON and MILBANK, JOHN, eds., 2009. The Radical Orthodoxy Reader Routledge.
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2009. Wisdom in Theology and Philosophy. In: MCGEE, M. and CORNWELL, J., eds., Philosophers Amongst the Gods Continuum.
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2009. Christ, Descent and Participation. In: PABST, ADRIAN and PADDISON, ANGUS, eds., The Pope and Jesus of Nazareth: Christ, Scripture and the Church London: SCM.
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2008. Love Makes the World Go ‘Round: Motion and Trinity. In: SCHINDLER, D.L., ed., Love Alone in Credible: Hans Urs von Balthasar as Interpreter of the Catholic Tradition Eerdmans.
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2008. What can Theology offer Religious Studies?. In: OLIVER, S. and WARRIER, M., eds., Theology and Religious Studies: An Exploration of Disciplinary Boundaries T&T Clark.
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2008. The Holy Trinity and the Liturgical Subject. In: LEACHMAN, J., ed., The Liturgical Subject: Subject, Subjectivity, and the Human Person in Contemporary Liturgical Discussion and Critique SCM.
  • OLIVER, SIMON and WARRIER, MAYA, eds., 2008. Theology and Religious Studies: An Exploration of Disciplinary Boundaries T&T Clark.
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2005. The Sweet Delight of Virtue and Grace in Aquinas’s Ethics International Journal of Systematic Theology. 7(1), 52-71
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2005. Philosophy, God and Motion Routledge.
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2005. Robert Grosseteste on Light, Truth and Experimentum Vivarium. 43(1), 109-138
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 2001. Motion according to Aquinas and Newton Modern Theology. 17(2), 163-199
  • OLIVER, SIMON, 1999. The Eucharist before Nature and Culture Modern Theology. 15(3), 331-353

Videos for the University of Nottingham

Why Study an MA in Systematic and Philosophic Theology at Nottingham

Why Study Plato

Why Study Aristotle

Why Study Negative Theology

Why Study Thomas Aquinas

Why Study Systematic Theology

Why Study the Theology of Creation

Philosophy in Theology with Karen Kilby and Simon Oliver

Sacramentality with Tom O’Loughlin and Simon Oliver

The Big Society with John Milbank and Simon Oliver

I hope you enjoyed these videos and will take the time to look up some of Simon’s work. He is an excellent and gracious theologian and it is my honour to work with him.

Yours,
David